The definition of 'AME Apprentice'

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joshuaaa
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The definition of 'AME Apprentice'

#1 Post by joshuaaa » Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:04 pm

Hello,
It is first time to write a question on this forum.
I just got my Aircraft Maintenance Technician diploma which comes with 18 months accreditation.
My AME license technical exam and writing exam will be waived except CARs Exam.
As I got diploma, I am looking for Apprentice AME job, some companies offer Apprentice job as well. However, the companies want candidates who already have previous experiences.
Are they looking for someone is just about to getting their license? Am I even eligible to apply position for Apprentice AME?
Somebody recommend me to start from ramp job, but I am foreigner, they do not even consider to hire me.
Can anyone recommend me the path to be Canadian AME?

PS: I got a phone call from the company that I applied, they asked me some questions such as immigration status, basic toolset, availability to relocate, and expriences. I answered them and they told me they will send some forms (at this time, I could not hear them clearly, even I do not know how that form will be sent) after several weeks. Is that right process to be hired?
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GyvAir
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Re: The definition of 'AME Apprentice'

#2 Post by GyvAir » Sat Jun 18, 2016 9:01 pm

“Apprentice job” and “Apprentice AME” are just two different ways of expressing the same thing. You will see different wordings as well. (“apprentice aircraft mechanic” “aircraft maintenance technician” etc.)


Companies may specify the level of apprentice experience they are seeking as well:

Entry level (No experience required, but college diploma is generally required)

Some experience (1 – 3 years experience, typical)

High time apprentice or experienced apprentice (nearly completed time and experience requirements for obtaining AME licence. 2.5 – 4 years experience, typical)

Again, the terms you see will vary, depending on who is writing the ad and the particular nature of the job or workplace structure. Airlines, for instance, seem to have their own language for describing technician, apprentice and AME levels within their own organization.


Hope that helps!

(Maybe someone else will jump in to explain why "apprentice AME" is really a misnomer..)


As for the hiring process, if you haven’t heard from them for several weeks after a phone interview, you probably won’t.

Are you fully legally entitled to work in Canada? Unless you can answer that with an unequivocal “yes”, you won’t be getting many call backs.
If you’re unsure, you need to ask an immigration professional, or Immigration and Citizenship Canada.
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/work/index.asp
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joshuaaa
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Re: The definition of 'AME Apprentice'

#3 Post by joshuaaa » Tue Jun 21, 2016 11:25 pm

GyvAir wrote:“Apprentice job” and “Apprentice AME” are just two different ways of expressing the same thing. You will see different wordings as well. (“apprentice aircraft mechanic” “aircraft maintenance technician” etc.)


Companies may specify the level of apprentice experience they are seeking as well:

Entry level (No experience required, but college diploma is generally required)

Some experience (1 – 3 years experience, typical)

High time apprentice or experienced apprentice (nearly completed time and experience requirements for obtaining AME licence. 2.5 – 4 years experience, typical)

Again, the terms you see will vary, depending on who is writing the ad and the particular nature of the job or workplace structure. Airlines, for instance, seem to have their own language for describing technician, apprentice and AME levels within their own organization.


Hope that helps!

(Maybe someone else will jump in to explain why "apprentice AME" is really a misnomer..)


As for the hiring process, if you haven’t heard from them for several weeks after a phone interview, you probably won’t.

Are you fully legally entitled to work in Canada? Unless you can answer that with an unequivocal “yes”, you won’t be getting many call backs.
If you’re unsure, you need to ask an immigration professional, or Immigration and Citizenship Canada.
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/work/index.asp

Thank you for answering.
I got 3 years work permit from my college when I was graduated.
It is open work permit, which is no restriction to work with any other employer.
I always answer 'Yes' for 'Are you fully legally entitled to work in Canada'.
However, I am a 'college graduates'. I think that is reason why they do not hire me.
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plhought
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Re: The definition of 'AME Apprentice'

#4 Post by plhought » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:06 am

Sorry to hear you are not having much luck.

It looks like (and no offense really!) that you are still having a bit of a problem with english syntax and diction. If you'd like, send me a private-message via this board and together maybe we can look at your cover letter and resume. I know it sounds trivial, but eliminating some errors-in-language can make a big difference on first impression.

If you don't mind me asking, Joshuaa, where are you from?
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joshuaaa
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Re: The definition of 'AME Apprentice'

#5 Post by joshuaaa » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:53 am

plhought wrote:Sorry to hear you are not having much luck.

It looks like (and no offense really!) that you are still having a bit of a problem with english syntax and diction. If you'd like, send me a private-message via this board and together maybe we can look at your cover letter and resume. I know it sounds trivial, but eliminating some errors-in-language can make a big difference on first impression.

If you don't mind me asking, Joshuaa, where are you from?
Hello,
It is okay, I know my English is not perfect enough. I have sent you my resume firstly, and if there is no problem with my resume, I will send you my cover letter.
By the way, I am from Korea, I have started to study English since 2012. However, My English is not getting better even though I am trying my best...
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conehead
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Re: The definition of 'AME Apprentice'

#6 Post by conehead » Thu Jun 23, 2016 8:48 am

Your English is much better than my Korean. :)
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Juggernaut
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Re: The definition of 'AME Apprentice'

#7 Post by Juggernaut » Sun Jun 26, 2016 5:16 pm

The term AME apprentice is an industry term only. It is a term that has been loosely borrowed from other provincially regulated trades such as automotive and heavy duty mechanics. Transport Canada doesn't recognize that term. In their eyes, an "apprentice AME" is defined as an AME applicant. The apprentice is coldly referred to as "The Applicant" in CAR 566.03... Lol! Ya gotta love the government's colorful terminology.

If you are looking for jobs in this industry and have no previous experience working on airplanes, then best to go up north. Apply for jobs in northern towns where few really want to go. Lots of operators up there need ramp hands for loading planes and general labor. You will get the occasional opportunity to help the engineers with work on the planes. If the engineer likes your work ethic, then you will work more on the plane as long as there is work to be done.
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