Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

This forum has been developed to discuss maintenance topics in Canada.

Moderators: North Shore, ahramin, sky's the limit, sepia, Sulako

Post Reply
Korn
Rank 0
Rank 0
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2019 9:21 pm

Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by Korn »

I plan to study AME basic training program in Canada as an international student, so I just wanted to be sure that I could landed a decent job in Canada after graduated.
Any thought of the aviation industry nowadays for fresh grad?
If there is any suggestion please let me know. Thank you
---------- ADS -----------
  

fish4life
Rank (9)
Rank (9)
Posts: 1746
Joined: Sun Jun 27, 2010 6:32 am

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by fish4life »

Korn wrote:
Thu Oct 03, 2019 9:39 pm
I plan to study AME basic training program in Canada as an international student, so I just wanted to be sure that I could landed a decent job in Canada after graduated.
Any thought of the aviation industry nowadays for fresh grad?
If there is any suggestion please let me know. Thank you
Are you willing to leave a major city for your first job?
---------- ADS -----------
  

Pacqing
Rank 3
Rank 3
Posts: 113
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2017 5:14 pm

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by Pacqing »

Do you have the right to work in Canada? Decent job? Now thats a matter for debate. Yes be prepared to go out of the big cities, look at Thompson Man, Norman wells, Iqaluit, Red Lake . Could you survive a few years in these places? Doubtful that you'd earn enough as an apprentice to live in the big cities anyway.
---------- ADS -----------
  

helicopterray
Rank 4
Rank 4
Posts: 218
Joined: Thu Nov 25, 2010 7:59 pm

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by helicopterray »

There's a shortage of 'experienced and qualified' AME's. How to get to that point is a bit of a struggle.
---------- ADS -----------
  

fonzy1977
Rank 0
Rank 0
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2019 8:48 am

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by fonzy1977 »

I am trying to gain experience and i am willing to work anywhere and prefer the north , wanting to get a apprentice position and i have been applying for months , is school the only way ? I am no dummy with tools and all i see is adds looking for experienced AME . But without getting your foot in the door how does one start
---------- ADS -----------
  

Pacqing
Rank 3
Rank 3
Posts: 113
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2017 5:14 pm

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by Pacqing »

You need to attend a recognized school otherwise your wasting your and the employees time.
---------- ADS -----------
  

edmanster
Rank 1
Rank 1
Posts: 41
Joined: Sun Nov 05, 2017 4:55 pm

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by edmanster »

I beg to differ with the last reply .. Big Time !
We seem to have transitioned through a culture change within the last 25 years where AME school + Licence is now considered the barest of minimums to work on an aircraft. I been from one side to of this country to the other within the last 30 years and worked from Flying schools to Air Canada Heavies. There was a time when u got hired beginning with washing and fuelling aircraft. The best mechanics ive seen did not require courses on how to use a screwdriver & wire lock - they were weened on the farm (or the hot-rod) & this talent was inherent. As a company gained confidence in someone - the jobs naturally matured to cleaning / fairings / opening panels etc. Someday .. if u deserved it - the trust with working on an engine. There was always 'someone in the know' to ask when in doubt. At the time - only a couple individuals had licences (only 1 was required to sign something out). We had handfuls of unlicensed people who where experts in what they did & had no desire to get licensed. They were paid on their abilities not qualifications. (yes!!! im aware of the QA / QC system requirements now .. )
- Today - its assumed that a AME tech school graduate will be able to walk up to an aircraft and troubleshoot it ... LOL (as the millenniums would say). Everybody is running around fighting for endorsements & qualifications - while being quite inadequate with their basic skill set. Been involved in numerous situations at Pearson - shear a screw - call for help! .. In the old days everybody had at least 3 techniques for extracting screws. Five years ago we had 2 Licensed Mechs (who the boss referred to as 'experienced') - spent 2+ weeks installing & rigging CRJ100 Flap system. Nobody else available thus I had to grind my teeth waiting for the AC release. Then we had a Licensed Mech tighten the MLG nut on so tight that it prevented the wheel from rotating. I dont recall silliness like this in my apprentice days .. maybe i was just naive.
- I dont believe there is a shortage - just that the skill set is gone & everything takes much longer to complete. How many time have you witnessed a junior attempt a task & botch it up so now the task is twice as expensive - Neither did he ask for assistance nor was any available. There is very little knowledge being transferred down from the experienced hands to the juniors .. & the only way for the juniors to learn is make the expensive error. Now that everybody expects to get paid top dollar - Companies cannot afford to have juniors shadowing the seniors and learning stuff. Nor do the seniors (or Contractors) want to share - because it 'cuts into' either their viability in the company or business. .. my 2 cents.. Thx for reading.
---------- ADS -----------
  

User avatar
tellyourkidstogetarealjob
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 386
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2005 12:11 am
Location: Cascadia

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by tellyourkidstogetarealjob »

Canada has never had an efficient system of training apprentices. Some countries hire apprentices while still in school. Summer employment, guaranteed (almost) employment upon graduation and sometimes a small stipend mean employers have an investment in their new apprentices. It has been found to be less expensive in the long run than alternative which is to throw training at large numbers of students and allowing them to compete in an open market upon graduation. Like salmon returning to spawn, the kill rate is huge.

Most maintenance manuals for modern aircraft are better written than they were a half century ago. The best apprentices can read them and, ideally, a wiring diagram.

I've worked with many farmers and home mechanics and have found many to be good. Some should have stayed home. I see no advantage or disadvantage in this regard.

For too long employers in Canada have benefited from a glut of trainees coming out of the post secondary system. They have allowed the new hires to feed on each other until only the strongest have survived. In theory, anyway. In reality some of the strongest were just better financed or had long-suffering families. A lot of good talent gave up on this industry and its' practices.

Kids these days have changed. They can research more on the internet and have their pick of trades to go into. Employers haven't. They still think it is 1960. Any shortage of experience is entirely of their own creation.

For example, I don't live in Ontario yet I know three very experienced mechanics who live within a short drive of one the frequent advertisers on this site. One prefers to stay on his hobby farm and the other two only work the occasional contract for that advertiser. None of them will consider working as a regular employee even though all have been asked. That is true for almost all the employers that post ads on this site. Many of them have established a reputation years ago and have carefully groomed it. They can't find people because they are known. They are too inflexible to adapt to a new reality.

Be wary of ads that demand multiple endorsements. Especially if they are in widely divergent aircraft types. These jobs may not exist. They can be posted for a variety of reasons. One of which is to pacify existing employees. "We tried to find new talent, but there's no one available. By the way, can you do come in on your days off again?"

Is there a shortage of aircraft mechanics in Canada? Depends on how you look at it. There is a shortage of experienced mechanics that will work in major airports situated in expensive areas, earn $50,000 - 60,000 a year, and be expected to be appropriately grateful. There always will be. There is no shortage of experienced mechanics that will work for a decent wage and a modicum of respect.
---------- ADS -----------
  

goingnowherefast
Rank (9)
Rank (9)
Posts: 1825
Joined: Wed Mar 13, 2013 9:24 am

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by goingnowherefast »

Sounds very similar to the pilot "shortage".

Wanna be treated like crap, paid very little and work in either a shithole remote town or a very expensive city? Try aviation!
---------- ADS -----------
  

User avatar
Pat Richard
Rank 8
Rank 8
Posts: 767
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 10:36 pm
Location: all over

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by Pat Richard »

Here"s a perfect example of the stupidity of many offers

Toronto Pearson International Airport, ON
Full-time, Contract
$55,000 - $70,000 a year
Aircraft Technician, Toronto Pearson International Airport, ON - Job Details | Indeed.com

Wright International Aircraft Maintenance Services is seeking M2 AME's and FAA, A&P Technicians for immediate positions in Toronto (YYZ)

Position: AME -M2 and A&P Technicians for Line Maintenance at the Toronto International Airport. (GTAA). Preference given to Technicians holding both AME & A&P license.

Send Resume & Cover Letter Via: email only

Aircraft Types: Transport Canada Approved training on B757 / B767 & A330 preferred. A320 & B737 an asset.

GTAA pass and AVOP - an asset.

Job Description:

Wright International is seeking experienced Technicians to support our Line Maintenance Operation at the Toronto International Airport, GTAA.. The Education Requirements and Qualifications:

Must have at least an Transport Canada Aircraft Maintenance Engineers License.
Strong Knowledge of Transport Canada Regulations
The ability to work both independently and in a team environment
Must possess strong organizational, communication and decision making skills
Line Maintenance Experience on Heavy Transport class aircraft an asset.
Some shift work required.
Must be a Canadian citizen or have landed status.
Must be able to pass security clearance and obtain the GTAA/Transport Canada security card (MOT).
Salary: commensurate with experience and qualifications held.

Job Types: Full-time, Contract

Salary: $55,000.00 to $70,000.00 /year
---------- ADS -----------
  

YYCAME
Rank 2
Rank 2
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2013 8:09 pm

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by YYCAME »

Getting your first job can be very tough because everyone wants experience. But if your willing to work for bad employers who can't keep good people, or sacrifice quality of life for a few years then it gives you more options. The easier path right now is to go to a college that offers a co-op program because it will give you some experience and logbook entries. Basically the way it works is you go to school for a year, then take a year to work in the co-op training program at Air Canada or other airlines if they start to offer it, and then go back to finish school before returning for yet another year in the co-op training program. You won't get paid much, and won't have any union protection, but at least you'll get experience on live aircraft and come out with almost enough time for your license and a completed logbook. There is a limited number of spots for the co-op program and your going to have to ask questions and take initiative to learn enough there but either way it's a pretty easy way into the industry. If you just want to coast then you'll feel like you have to work at Air Canada because you don't have the skills to go elsewhere, but if you want to learn there is opportunity if you ask people to show you more. Good luck! PS. Wind turbines are another good option since they are a growing industry with no clear educational requirements yet.
---------- ADS -----------
  

User avatar
MZUNGO
Rank 4
Rank 4
Posts: 216
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 9:45 pm
Location: YVR

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by MZUNGO »

Pat Richard wrote:
Tue Oct 29, 2019 9:15 pm
Here"s a perfect example of the stupidity of many offers

Salary: $55,000.00 to $70,000.00 /year
at least they took the time to tell us what airport and type of aircraft. but the last line is a effing joke.
---------- ADS -----------
  

iflyforpie
Top Poster
Top Poster
Posts: 7943
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 12:25 pm
Location: Winterfell...

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by iflyforpie »

There’s a shortage of well-paid AMEs.

And the farm kids line is hogwash. In school the farm kids were always the first to volunteer (because they knew how to do it and wanted to show off to the rest of the class how smart they were) both depriving people who could have gained experience trying to do it the first time... and invariably fucking it up (have fun sorting out those lifter bodies, genius... if you’d read a Haynes manual you’d know even in cars they have to go back in the same spot).

I had no mechanical experience beyond what a poor kid who couldn’t afford to take his car to a shop in the pre-internet days did (never took shop classes, raised in a home full of girls) and I could hold my own against AMEs my senior.

I’ll never forget the look of frustration on the other crew chiefs face as the CB kept blowing on the GPU every time they put main power on a 727. Im really good with hearing noises out of the ordinary... even today, and knew the AC pack ground blower fans were on.

So I tell this crew chief, I think the ground blower fans are on. He says, annoyed, that’s not the ground blower fan.. that’s just the avionics cooling fan. He goes up the ladder into the cockpit to see what’s going on. I go after him. Squeeze around him. Go up to the FE panel. GROUND BLOWER FANS [OFF] Give him a look for 5 seconds, then disappear. :wink:

I had a choice. Fly or fix. Flying offered a lot more money even though I lacked the required license at the time. I’m making almost $20k/yr higher than an experienced, endorsed, ACAed line mech at my company. Why wrench unless you have no other choice and are attached to aviation for some reason?
---------- ADS -----------
  
Geez did I say that....? Or just think it....?

User avatar
dashx
Rank (9)
Rank (9)
Posts: 1227
Joined: Sat Dec 23, 2006 11:51 am

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by dashx »

Wright International Aircraft Maintenance Services is seeking M2 AME's and FAA, A&P Technicians for immediate positions in Toronto (YYZ)
Ah Mario..... Time to retire to the farm....
---------- ADS -----------
  

drone_driver24
Rank 0
Rank 0
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Sep 08, 2019 7:32 am

Re: Is there really a shortage of aircraft mechanic in Canada?

Post by drone_driver24 »

We've had lots of guys start out as tow crew, interior and interior avionic mechanics, and hangar cleaners, before getting hired as maintenance. They were trade school grads, they just needed to get their foot in the door. They worked OT A checks, to get some logbook time, and experience, then when positions became available, stepped into their career.
---------- ADS -----------
  

Post Reply

Return to “Maintenance”