AME tech exams

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GoWrench
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Need some help with AME exams

#1 Post by GoWrench » Sat Sep 18, 2004 6:47 am

Hi everyone. I'm starting to write my AME exams. I have found the TC study guide isn't very good. Can anyone suggest some better study guides?
I have the Jeppeson Text Books, but what I would like to know, is what do I really need to study?
Thanx in advance. Nick
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#2 Post by KISS_MY_TCAS » Sat Sep 18, 2004 9:14 pm

Am I missing something here....I thought TC wasn't administering technical exams anymore, just the CARS exam. At any rate, textbooks, college notes, and for god sakes ask around to engineers you know. There are plenty of "black market study guides" out there.
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#3 Post by Theman » Mon Sep 20, 2004 3:56 pm

TC is doing a similiar thing to the FAA, 3 exams Std Prct, Afrm, Eng and then CARs.

Jeppeson is the best guide now! Used to be "memory recall" exams from fresh licences, these are still good. Ask around to guys on the floor.

Good Luck
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br801
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Re: Need some help with AME exams

#4 Post by br801 » Mon Sep 20, 2004 11:42 pm

The TC study guide is still useful, at least it could give you a "direction" while reading the book, then you will not read the section assigned for other license.
And you will also need to read the book of "ASA" version and FAA hand book, Jeppeson is also nesscessory. I don't know the situation in your city, when I took the exam in Vancouver, I found sometime they just picked up a sentence from the book, expecially for the sentence with numebr, data, demension.....etc. so, be careful while reading....sometime you will feel funny...

GoWrench wrote:Hi everyone. I'm starting to write my AME exams. I have found the TC study guide isn't very good. Can anyone suggest some better study guides?
I have the Jeppeson Text Books, but what I would like to know, is what do I really need to study?
Thanx in advance. Nick
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#5 Post by planeguy » Sat Oct 16, 2004 3:31 pm

The transport examination guideline has nothing to do with the exams. At the front of the guidebook, transport canada states that they reserve the right to change anything on any of the exams, including leaving out any subjects or adding additional subjects.

Personally, after taking the Airframe examinations and following the guidelines, I spoke to a head dude downtown Toronto. I asked him why 8 out of the 20 subjects from the guideline were missing (including ice and rain systems) from the examination and replaced by 30 helicopter questions including engine questions. There was a question on Form Drag which is also known as Pressure Drag and after checking through my own airframe textbook, the technical aircraft dictionary, and the newest jeppesen airframe textbooks, there were no definitions of it, so i looked up on the internet and found it on an engineering website. Another question i showed him on Anti-skid had no correct answer. After agreeing, he said that I should have chosen the most correct answer, and I asked him if there is a difference between the most correct operation of anti-skid and the correct operation. He said "well, obviously, but that's not what we're looking for".

He told me that there are 5 different exams for airframe. I told him that if i took another exam right then and passed, it wouldn't look very good on the exam system. He looked at me grimly.

In other words, as he said: "It's the luck of the draw". So just read and study everything and anything you can find and give the guideline back to transport canada, just like I did.
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Plane guy

#6 Post by KKboy » Sun Oct 17, 2004 4:03 am

So you flunked the paper and took it out on some one who has nothing to do with writing the exam?


Some times the best thing to do is sit all examinations without serious study and take your chances on a failure.
You will have a very good idea on the second attempt as to what to expect and more than likely be sucessful.

TC exams are easy try they British JAR modules, FAA A+P is too simple even Bush could pass one of these.
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#7 Post by planeguy » Sun Oct 17, 2004 11:18 am

Took it out on someone? Let's see here if i had a valid point:

29. During a potential skid, how does an anti-skid system work?

1) All of the pressure to the brakes is increased to slow down the wheels equally to prevent the skid.
2) All of the pressure to the brakes is dumped to allow the wheels to rotate equally to prevent the skid.
3) The pressure to the skidding wheel is increased to prevent the skid.
4) The pressure to the skidding wheel is slowly decreased to prevent the skid.

The correct answer is the pressure to the skidding wheel is dumped into the system manifold and reapplied at a slightly reduced pressure to the brake.

I got 68% on the exam; 62 out of 90 which means i failed by one question because I selected #2. I think i have the right to take it out on the manager at the testing centre.
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#8 Post by F/L 250 » Sun Oct 31, 2004 6:23 am

[/quote] Took it out on someone? Let's see here if i had a valid point:

29. During a potential skid, how does an anti-skid system work?

1) All of the pressure to the brakes is increased to slow down the wheels equally to prevent the skid.
2) All of the pressure to the brakes is dumped to allow the wheels to rotate equally to prevent the skid.
3) The pressure to the skidding wheel is increased to prevent the skid.
4) The pressure to the skidding wheel is slowly decreased to prevent the skid.

The correct answer is the pressure to the skidding wheel is dumped into the system manifold and reapplied at a slightly reduced pressure to the brake.

I think we can all agree that 1 &3 can be tossed out. The px. isn't increased. That leaves 2&4. ( what sound reasoning) #2 If ALL the px was reduced to the brakes all of a sudden you would have no braking. As bad as skidding is, I think this scenario would be worse. That leaves #4. Although poorly worded this is still the most correct. Only the px to the skidding wheel is reduced. I know it doesn't help now,and you have been told by many I'm sure, RYPQ squared. Everyone who has written T.C. exams know that T.C. doesn't care what you know, they want you to write an english exam. I have written my AME exams as well as PPL CPL IFR and ATPL exams. Man I hope I don't have to write any more. Good luck in the future and just remember the guy at the office didn't make them up.
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Horseman
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CARS STUDY GUIDE

#9 Post by Horseman » Sun Oct 31, 2004 10:13 am

Go Wrench

Just bought a study guide from http://www...com/website/gsc/ame.html

There are 4 practice exams at the back that will help.

This is for CARs only, but will help cover the material most likely on the CARs exam. $44.95 + shipping.


Horseman
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jbergen
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refresher course, study guides

#10 Post by jbergen » Tue Jan 04, 2005 9:32 pm

If you're close to the 'peg, take Stevenson Aviation's refresher courses. You'll be sure to pass.

For regulatory exam, buy "CAR's for the AME' by Bill Fraser, an instructor at Stevenson. It's easy to read and has 4 exams in the back to practice. That's what I used and scored 97.5 (they threw out two questions)

As for the old exams, it doesn't matter what the right answer is, it matters what TC has decided the true answer is.
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#11 Post by GoWrench » Sat Jan 08, 2005 8:26 am

Thanx so far to everyone for the advice.
Well I took my airframe exam, and I failed it by 1%. Under the new combined system, I had about 25-30 helicopter questions, and thats where I pretty well got stumped. I did not expeexct that many rotorcraft questions. Oh well. I got the ASA prepware CD, but it dosent have enough helicopter stuff in it.
Well time to get back to my books.
Cheers Nick.
Thanx to everyone, keep the advice coming.
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#12 Post by planeguy » Sun Jan 09, 2005 10:01 am

as ridiculous as this may sound... i got fed up with this new exam system and just read the entire airframe book from beginning to end... at the end of it, i looked at every major system in modern aircraft and asked myself if i knew pretty much all components...
for example hydraulics: whether it be a shuttle valve, priority valve, sequence valve, open center closed center, pressure reducing valve, hydraulic fuse, unloading valve, thermal relief, pressure relief, selector valve, check valve, orifice valve, or whatever, ... and just basically took about two months to study everything and anything, and finally still barely passed the exam...
helichoppers are a surprisingly large part of the airframe exam and i had to borrow a helicopter text from a dude because the airframe wasn't enough... just be sure you're confident that you have a starving chance on any question they ask (other than helicopter vibration ratios) and you'll do alrite... i think the easiest way to pass, as an old supervisor once told me, was to 'just read the whole damn thing'... 442 pages later, he was right...
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#13 Post by GoWrench » Thu Jan 27, 2005 3:24 pm

Well I passed the airframe exam. The helicopter stuff I studied was more than enough to pass.
So now on to Powerplant. Can anyone tell what to expect this time round?
Is there a lot of piston stuff? Props? I have never worked on anything other than turbines, so any help would be great.
Thanx to everyone in advance.
Cheers Nick.
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#14 Post by br801 » Sun Mar 13, 2005 12:46 am

ok, one more example:

what is to represent total pressure at compressor outlet?

A. P2 B.P3 C.P4 D.P5

Everybody know the dual rotor Engine is popular today, since the TC always choose some weird topic to make a question, it is hard to understand its' mind. for this question, I maybe a tricky one or not, at least, it should state if it is single or dual rotor engine.
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Exams are done

#15 Post by GoWrench » Sun Mar 13, 2005 9:28 am

Thanx for everyone's advice and help. Passed powerplant. Now to get log book submitted and finally the CARS.
After finally seeing the end of the tunnel, I think its time to really apply myself. I think I need to focus on the road ahead.

Forklift repair, here I come. JK


Thanx to everyone cheers Nick.
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#16 Post by planeguy » Sun Mar 13, 2005 10:43 am

Good job
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ian254
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transport tech exams

#17 Post by ian254 » Mon Dec 11, 2006 8:04 pm

Wondering if anybody out here knows of any good study aids for the 3 tech exams from transport?
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ian254
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#18 Post by ian254 » Tue Dec 12, 2006 3:25 pm

nobody have any ideas at all????????
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#19 Post by Snips » Tue Dec 12, 2006 3:42 pm

I used the ASA Aviation Maintenance Technician textbooks by Dale Crane to study for the M rating exams. There were 3 books, General/Powerplant and Structures-Systems(divided into 2 volumes). They were pretty comprehensive and I passed. I bought them on Amazon. Hope this helps
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#20 Post by Fox 3 » Tue Dec 12, 2006 7:46 pm

ian254 wrote:nobody have any ideas at all????????
nobody has any ideas

Sorry, bad english drives me nuts.


On the topic: I just studied the Jeppesen airframe, powerplant and general textbooks. They make a study guide as well last I looked. If you post where you are, I can try to help find a source.


hth

~FOX~
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ian254
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#21 Post by ian254 » Tue Dec 12, 2006 8:37 pm

sorry for the bad english, I have the jeppesen books from college thanks for the help.
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henry chinaski
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#22 Post by henry chinaski » Wed Dec 13, 2006 9:10 am

the TC exams draw the questions from the same pool as the FAA for the most part. studied the FAA questions and the TC exams had very few surprises for me. there are FAA question books out there. there is a book with a zillion questions, all that you'll see on tc exams.

go to this site:
http://www.faa.gov/education_research/t ... questions/
click on the links under 'aviation mechanic' and you will see hundreds of questions. i swear this is where transport pulls there questions from word for word. the only bad part is the site doesn't provide the answer key.
they do provide a refernece to the jeppesen books to look up the ansers though. you have to dig them up.
but there are books with these questions you should be able to find on the web or in a store like aviation world that has these questions with the answer key.
if you do these questions you will pass the exams no sweat.

i think these are the books. i had older ones, different covers. i am sure these are the books. the dale crane ones, like g_parsnips posted. they are not the ones you get in college.

http://www.pilotmall.com/store/merchant ... ore_code=1

get these books and the exams are a breeze.
and one bonus tip... study helicopters a LOT. there is like 16 questions out of 50 on the exam(airframe i think) on whirly birds. read the airframe book helicopters over and over.
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ian254
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#23 Post by ian254 » Wed Dec 13, 2006 4:43 pm

THANKS HUGE,
I WAS GOING THROUGH ALL THE STUFF IN THE TEXT BOOKS AND GETTING VERY OVERWHELMED

THANKS AGAIN
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#24 Post by ian254 » Wed Dec 20, 2006 8:48 pm

just back wondering again, does anybody else have some ideas in what else to use to study with?
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Lyle Lanley
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Transport Exams

#25 Post by Lyle Lanley » Mon Jan 08, 2007 11:28 am

Has anyone taken the tech exams recently? What is actually on the exams? I'm mostly concerned with the Airframe exam, I know there are a lot of helicopter questions, but what else to expect? There is no way the whole study guide is on the test, but what is on it?
Any help is greatly appriciated. Thanks alot
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