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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:28 am 
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Hello all,

I am currently studying for my PPL Written and I was wondering if the notes in Sharpers Edge are really all I need to study for the test. I've heard a few people say that all they've studied is the Sharpers Edge book and the Canadian Private Pilot Answer Guide and they got 90% on the test...not sure why exactly, but I find that hard to believe. I ask because I've been reading from the ground up and haven't really learned much from it, and I think I've learned more from Sharpers Edge. So if sharpers edge is really all I need, I would just store away my from the ground up copy and solely study sharpers edge. Also how do you guys recommend that i study for the test, should I break down the 4 topics into sections and spend a certain amount of hours a day on each section, or study one full topic then move onto the next, etc.

Thanks.



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:48 am 
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I liked the Sharper Edge books. I found the PPL and CPL books to be very useful in conjunction with FTGU, the AIM, and the Weather Manual. The ATPL Sharper Edge book on the other hand I would avoid. It was not very good.

The Sharper Edge book has a lot of good questions in it that will prepare you for the exam. They have good diagrams and visuals. Also download and print the practise exams from TC's site. They are helpful. If you have a few bucks to spend, buy the Dauntless PPL app on your phone/ipad. Run through all the questions.



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:48 am 
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Well, fledging young eagle:

Let me share this with you.

After you pass the tests. You will be issued a PLL. :rock: :rock: yeah!

Now you face a much more difficult test. Every time you fly. And the failure to pass can mean bent metal, injury or death.
There will be no shortcuts, answer keys, study guides. You actually have to know things.

FTGU. Has been around since before I started to fly decades ago. It has been updated, and is excellent. If you are not getting much out of it, you might want to ponder why not. The problem might just not be FTGU.

If you know your stuff, really all you need to do is become familiar with the wordings of a TC exam...last time I saw a FTGU, they even had practice exams in them.

The Flight training manual , and whatever Weather Ways is called now are two essential reference books. You will be dealing with weather for the rest of your flying career. Understand it...easier said than done. Never forget that you will be tested on weather on every flight for the rest of your life. Lots of accident stats to show who failed.

The point here is stop trying to take shortcuts. I know FTGU can be difficult reading for some, but work through it...for both knowledge and understanding...

Despite what people say, the TC exams are not all that difficult...if you know your stuff.

Now quit spending time here and get on the books. Best of luck in your studies



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 10:07 am 
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Have to agree with trey kule 100%. I have been flying for 35+ years and still re-read the FTGU, Flight Training Manual and Air Command Weather Manual(up dated versions) every couple of years. I have read lots of other books but still always recommend those 3 as must know and more importantly understand.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 7:14 am 
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PPL is a license to learn. Keep learning!


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 10:27 am 
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I reread the OP again.

To answer how you should study is really difficult as most people achieve results differently. Some like to study in the morning. Some in the evening. Some in seclusion...you get the idea.

The challange of learning for the ppl is everything is connected. Want to learn about altimetry...need to know some meterology as it pertains to the atmosphere. Which do you study first?

This is strictly from personal experience on exams over the years. First get the TC study guide , or, again, whatever its called. It used to give all the subjects in a list.

Now go through everything fairly in depth and get an overall picture of the course material.
Then work through each part in detail.

For a ppl it might help to connect it to a flight...

For example...before flight...document check...know the documents you need on board
Weather..how to check. How to interpret
Weight and balance. Includes requirement to know type of fuel, weight of fuel, standard pax weights, vfr reserve requirements, and more...
When you have gotten more into the ground schoold plan the flight...
Requires knowledge of vfr cruising altitudes, airspace vfr requirements, radio, air speed corrections, wind corrections...etc.

This will help put it all together.....maybe. It hopefully replaces the learn to pass the test with I can see why I need to know this.
When you bump into something, for example, the fuel colour , weight etc, go to the FTGU and look at fuels. Different colours, weights etc. Get into the POH and look at fuel burns. Dont just go and flip through the FTGU and say...ah yes...the colour of 100ll is blue. Ask yourself what colour is jet A . What what happens if you mix them...

I dont know if this will help you in your exam, but I found , many years ago, pilots that did this completed their PPLs is less flight time, and in advanced training, relating things to what you are doing is a benefit. At a couple hundred an hour for dual, you are getting well paid to study.

BTW...free advice. Take it for what you paid for it



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2017 9:56 am 
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Using a good book to learn is not a short cut.

OP, Sharper Edge is good. But, use the other books in conjunction as they all have their place.



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PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2017 12:40 am 
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Agree 150% with both posts by trey kule.

To reiterate what I told you before, understand your material. Don't just know the answer by cold memorization. Understand why the answer is correct or is not correct. This will make you a better and safer pilot downstream. Sharper Edge may be great, good, use it if you have it, but don't ignore FTGU (and AWCM and FTM), they have been the basic/standard books for Canadian flight training since the beginning of time.

As stated above, if you're not learning anything from them, try another approach, because those books cover basically EVERYTHING for PPL and CPL in Canada.

In the end gauge yourself with some practice exams. See where you stand, strong and weak points and tackle it from there.... if you don't know how else to approach things.



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