French aspiring pilot about to cross the Atlantic

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CyrilQ.06
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French aspiring pilot about to cross the Atlantic

#1 Post by CyrilQ.06 » Thu Sep 07, 2017 11:23 am

Hello everyone,

My name is Cyril, I'm 24, as you probably have guessed I am french, and I am currently studying and considering a move to your welcoming country !

I have already a lot of information about flight school, and as many quotation. But I still have some question about living the dream in Canada.

About having a part time job ?
I will probably begin my training being under Study Permit, it will allow me to work some 20 hours a week. So I would like to know if it will be sustainable for me to go flying, following the ground school and having a job together ?

Having a part-time job will help me a lot, I could at least pay for my accommodation, food, and occasionally some beers :)
I could also improve my English, and meet people.

In what order doing his licence/qualification ?
I've read a lot of things about the order to follow, and I still don't have the key...
I would do my Multi and Instrument rating before the CPL, in order to have more hour for my CPL. But some people are saying that it's probably not the best way... What would you advise ?

About the first job in a cockpit ?
I don't think that I am made for being an instructor, and only doing it in order to gain hour must probably bring me to do dirty work...
So, I would like to know if there are some opportunity to get a job only having the CPL, other than instructor ? Will I need at least the Instrument rating ?

Type rating or not type rating ?
Once again, I'm reading a lot of different version about the usefulness of having the type rating of such more advanced aircraft as the Caravan, Twin Otter, and other charter operation aircraft.
Will it be necessary to pass some type rating to get a job on these airplanes ?

I think that's all for today, thank you for your help,

regards

Cyril
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CanadianAviatrix
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Re: French aspiring pilot about to cross the Atlantic

#2 Post by CanadianAviatrix » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:36 pm

Not sure where you plan to move in Canada or what type of visa you are coming on or type of school you are attending, but I will try and give the most information I can.
If you plan to come over on a student visa and go to a college or university, you can only work a part time job I believe up to 20 hours. If you are coming and are going to do it privately through a flight club, I know a lot of people did this in Quebec at my last flight school, and most weren't allowed to work on the type of visa they came on, and only the school itself could hire them, and that was pretty much slave labour. Most airlines here won't hire a foreign pilot, and it's understandable. I have some friends that are from overseas and have been looking for over a year without luck in any sort of flying job after completing school because they are not citizens.
For the flying aspect, I honestly have no idea. Not sure if someone else can answer that question that would have more knowledge than me.
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TG
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Re: French aspiring pilot about to cross the Atlantic

#3 Post by TG » Tue Sep 12, 2017 1:27 pm

Quickly:

Private, commercial, twin, instruments are usually done in this order.
(the easiest to the more complicated)

This concept of type rating paid by yourself is an European's "virus" that did not contaminated North America yet. It won't be much of a help.

All in all, you will need a work permit or immigration status.
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CyrilQ.06
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Re: French aspiring pilot about to cross the Atlantic

#4 Post by CyrilQ.06 » Tue Sep 19, 2017 1:00 am

Hello everybody,

Thanks for you answer.

I'm planning to come with a student visa, and do my training in an aeroclub (probably Cornwall Aviation, Ontario).
And I will ask for a student permit, which allows me to work 20 hours a week.

So, doing a "modular" training, will I be able to work these 20 hours, and in the meantime get my licence, at my rythm ?

Thanks

Cyril
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HansDietrich
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Re: French aspiring pilot about to cross the Atlantic

#5 Post by HansDietrich » Tue Oct 10, 2017 10:35 am

CyrilQ.06 wrote:Hello everybody,

Thanks for you answer.

I'm planning to come with a student visa, and do my training in an aeroclub (probably Cornwall Aviation, Ontario).
And I will ask for a student permit, which allows me to work 20 hours a week.

So, doing a "modular" training, will I be able to work these 20 hours, and in the meantime get my licence, at my rythm ?

Thanks

Cyril
Cornwall has some of the worst training around. They'll give you a license, but that won't reflect on your ability to actually fly a plane. I suggest you go train at a better facility. If I were a Chief Pilot, anyone that would have "Cornwall" on their resume would have their resumes thrown in the garbage.

As far as coming to Canada and to work, I recommend you lose that European mentality of paying for a type rating or that some jobs are "beneath" you. I know that, because I'm also European. I know how I used to think. Canadians are a lot more humble than us and they are better people for that reason.

Working / flight training will be hard, but not impossible. Getting that right to live and work in Canada is the most important part.
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star57
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Re: French aspiring pilot about to cross the Atlantic

#6 Post by star57 » Fri Oct 27, 2017 6:31 pm

CyrilQ.06 wrote:Hello everyone,

My name is Cyril, I'm 24, as you probably have guessed I am french, and I am currently studying and considering a move to your welcoming country !

I have already a lot of information about flight school, and as many quotation. But I still have some question about living the dream in Canada.

About having a part time job ?
I will probably begin my training being under Study Permit, it will allow me to work some 20 hours a week. So I would like to know if it will be sustainable for me to go flying, following the ground school and having a job together ?

Having a part-time job will help me a lot, I could at least pay for my accommodation, food, and occasionally some beers :)
I could also improve my English, and meet people.

In what order doing his licence/qualification ?
I've read a lot of things about the order to follow, and I still don't have the key...
I would do my Multi and Instrument rating before the CPL, in order to have more hour for my CPL. But some people are saying that it's probably not the best way... What would you advise ?

About the first job in a cockpit ?
I don't think that I am made for being an instructor, and only doing it in order to gain hour must probably bring me to do dirty work...
So, I would like to know if there are some opportunity to get a job only having the CPL, other than instructor ? Will I need at least the Instrument rating ?

Type rating or not type rating ?
Once again, I'm reading a lot of different version about the usefulness of having the type rating of such more advanced aircraft as the Caravan, Twin Otter, and other charter operation aircraft.
Will it be necessary to pass some type rating to get a job on these airplanes ?

I think that's all for today, thank you for your help,

regards

Cyril
I think you should go for a Falcon 7X type rating, once you hit 225 hours, it’s just about the mouse and side stick, similar to being in a puckman game, after all it’s French plane with an attitude, just like you, better chance of being hired... that’s why they call it Easy.
There is lot of young men in this continent that spent a lot of time in 185, 206 and other pistons for $12.50 per hour, and that’s after doing 4 or 5 years instructing and ramping before smelling a PT6 in a Caravan, or B1900or KingAir and by then they were close to their 40th birthday.
Best of luck to you mon ami
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skybluetrek
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Re: French aspiring pilot about to cross the Atlantic

#7 Post by skybluetrek » Sat Oct 28, 2017 8:46 am

Why not staying in Europe mon ami? You already have the right to live and work there, not only during the training but all the time! I'm not sure how realistic it is for you to get a student visa with the right to work, if you apply saying you want to do your training at a flying club in Canada. To be honest I think you're better off doing it in France where you can study and work at your own pace. Your country has a reasonable good GA with plenty aeroclubs, and the hiring outlook in Europe is also good as long as you have a frozen ATPL + the money for a TR. Have in mind that converting from TC to EASA is an expensive, bureaucratic and painfull process.

You will find the answers to all of your questions on this blog, if you actually take the time to do your research thoroughly. And perhaps a good idea is to start by reviewing this thread: viewtopic.php?f=13&t=94553
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zealer
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Re: French aspiring pilot about to cross the Atlantic

#8 Post by zealer » Sat Oct 28, 2017 2:54 pm

HansDietrich wrote:
CyrilQ.06 wrote:Hello everybody,

Thanks for you answer.

I'm planning to come with a student visa, and do my training in an aeroclub (probably Cornwall Aviation, Ontario).
And I will ask for a student permit, which allows me to work 20 hours a week.

So, doing a "modular" training, will I be able to work these 20 hours, and in the meantime get my licence, at my rythm ?

Thanks

Cyril
Cornwall has some of the worst training around. They'll give you a license, but that won't reflect on your ability to actually fly a plane. I suggest you go train at a better facility. If I were a Chief Pilot, anyone that would have "Cornwall" on their resume would have their resumes thrown in the garbage.

As far as coming to Canada and to work, I recommend you lose that European mentality of paying for a type rating or that some jobs are "beneath" you. I know that, because I'm also European. I know how I used to think. Canadians are a lot more humble than us and they are better people for that reason.

Working / flight training will be hard, but not impossible. Getting that right to live and work in Canada is the most important part.
What is the issue with Cornwall? I was looking to go there for multi conversion and IFR.
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Bede
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Re: French aspiring pilot about to cross the Atlantic

#9 Post by Bede » Sat Oct 28, 2017 5:22 pm

CyrilQ.06 wrote:I am currently studying and considering a move to your welcoming country !
Hey Cyril,
After reading this forum, you'll find that some Canadians aren't that welcoming. Thankfully they tend to congregate to the nether regions of the internet. :? The vast majority of pilots that you will interact with will be very welcoming.

I don't know much about the French aviation industry, but what are your career objectives (airline, float flying, etc)? How do most pilots get their start in France? Would it be worthwhile to study here, then return to France for an airline job?

Anyways, best of luck coming here. All the best.
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