Switching to flying in the US

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WarmSandDreams
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Switching to flying in the US

Post by WarmSandDreams » Mon Nov 12, 2018 12:39 pm

Hi All,
just a brief about myself for clarity's sake, I'm Canadian born and raised and thought I'd always fly in Canada through my career. However I have landed myself a green card in the US through marriage. I've converted my AA's over to the FAA, now I'm just looking for a bit of advice. I'm thinking of applying at some American carriers, and really I'm just wondering how different it is flying for a US carrier vs a Canadian one. I've been a 705 captain for a little bit, but really have no experience flying south of the border. If anyone else has made the switch and could let me know their expereince, ie differences in training, rules, things to study to make the switch easier, that would be greatly appreciated! I've been trying to get my hands on some sample SOP's or FCOM's just to see if they have different philosphies than we do, but haven't had any luck.
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Stinky
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by Stinky » Sat Nov 17, 2018 5:24 pm

Start working on a four year degree at a US university or you'll have no chance at a major. If you have a Canadian degree you can have it evaluated and transfer the credits to the US school.
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jd832
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by jd832 » Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:53 am

WarmSandDreams wrote:
Mon Nov 12, 2018 12:39 pm
Hi All,
just a brief about myself for clarity's sake, I'm Canadian born and raised and thought I'd always fly in Canada through my career. However I have landed myself a green card in the US through marriage. I've converted my AA's over to the FAA, now I'm just looking for a bit of advice. I'm thinking of applying at some American carriers, and really I'm just wondering how different it is flying for a US carrier vs a Canadian one. I've been a 705 captain for a little bit, but really have no experience flying south of the border. If anyone else has made the switch and could let me know their expereince, ie differences in training, rules, things to study to make the switch easier, that would be greatly appreciated! I've been trying to get my hands on some sample SOP's or FCOM's just to see if they have different philosphies than we do, but haven't had any luck.
It's very different for the better. The airlines put a lot more money into training and the experience level of the new hire first officers is a lot higher. FO's aren't treated like babies like they are here. You will not see low experience pilots at the majors.

U.S. commercial aviation is very big on aircraft systems. One of the big differences before a checkride or PPC is a systems oral exam. Some carriers do it before you start sim training right after systems ground school and other do it after sim training just before you hop in the sim for your checkride. They could be an hour one or two in length. Some carries will ask you systems questions during the interview about previous aircraft you've flown.

If you haven't flown south of the border much, you will quickly realize what a high density traffic airport looks and feels like, but you'll get use to it quick.

The FAA is a lot more present in the US than TC is here in Canada. It's normal to have the FAA jump seating several times a year in your jump seat.

I would study Part 91 and par 121 for the FARS.

If you get on with a US carrier you shouldn't have any issues with different philosophies. They will train you and you'll get use to it quickly. Attend lots of JOB fairs if you can. Do volunteer work if you can. They like to see that on you application.

https://www.airlinepilotcentral.com/
https://www.aerocrewsolutions.com/
https://fapa.aero/
https://www.airlineapps.com/jobs/default.aspx
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jaburn
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by jaburn » Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:08 pm

How hard was it to switch over your licence to an FAA ?
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Stinky
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by Stinky » Thu Nov 22, 2018 3:48 pm

It's harder now than it used to be. For me it was medical, verification letter and 50 question exam.
Now you're to take a CTP course which includes ground training and SIM and costs about $5000.
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JBI
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by JBI » Thu Nov 22, 2018 4:43 pm

While I don't have direct experience flying for a US carrier, I have been back and forth between Canada and the US for quite some time, so just a couple notes/resources if you haven't run across them yet.

Check out Aerocrewnews.com for information on each of the different carriers. Take with a bit of a grain of salt as a lot of it is US regionals trying to sell themselves to potential pilots, but the airline working condition charts are very helpful in determine which carriers have bases where and what the current bonuses are etc.

As I understand the more recent legislation, you are not eligible to be a Captain on Part 121 aircraft until you have 1000 SIC time with a US carrier. So even if you had years of PIC time on an RJ, you couldn't be a direct entry Captain for the same aircraft in the US - you'd need 1000 hours SIC time (but it can be in any part 121 carrier - i.e. could be a different aircraft).

Best of luck!
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WarmSandDreams
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by WarmSandDreams » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:27 pm

jaburn wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:08 pm
How hard was it to switch over your licence to an FAA ?
http://www.avcanada.ca/forums2/viewtopi ... 28#p963028

There is a guy on that thread that does a great job of explaining how to do it. It's a bit of a pain getting all the steps done, but it's manageable. As said above you have to do a 7 day course with a couple of days of sim time that will cost you 4-7k. Other than that there is a test, you need to get a medical, and you need to submit a form to the FAA to get your license verified.

Thanks a lot everyone else for the info, it's been very helpful!
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by C-GGGQ » Wed Dec 26, 2018 3:27 pm

So with the ATP-CTP ourse requirement now, would it be the same or easier to convert a CPL and then, EARN your FAA ATP vs Earn you Canadian ATPL then convert? Turns out my wife is getting sick of the Canadian Nursing licensing stalls and like us pilots much lower pay. Difference is US will take nurse, and then sponsor their husbands too. Might be bailing on the great white north to spend time with the Fam in Phoenix instead :lol:
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by JBI » Wed Dec 26, 2018 11:52 pm

C-GGGQ wrote:
Wed Dec 26, 2018 3:27 pm
So with the ATP-CTP ourse requirement now, would it be the same or easier to convert a CPL and then, EARN your FAA ATP vs Earn you Canadian ATPL then convert? Turns out my wife is getting sick of the Canadian Nursing licensing stalls and like us pilots much lower pay. Difference is US will take nurse, and then sponsor their husbands too. Might be bailing on the great white north to spend time with the Fam in Phoenix instead :lol:
That would be great, but find out exactly what type of visa they would offer your wife. There are very few US Visas where the spouse gets a right to work in the US. Both NAFTA TN Visas and H1B Visas permit a spouse to come live in the US, but not work.
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by C-GGGQ » Thu Dec 27, 2018 9:50 am

Oh I've checked that out thoroughly. I forget the designation off the top of my head, but it's a work permit for the spouse too (and giant bonus, provided housing... Etc....etc.) they are constantly headhunting especially immigrant nurses who are having a hard time navigating the Canadian nursing red tape. She worked at a trauma center in Saudi Arabia as an RN for 5 years. Took her 2 years just to get her long sorted out here and has to search across the country for a place that will upgrade to RN since every province requirements are different.....it's a gong show. Plus my father lives there and is a citizen but I am too old for him to sponsor lol. But she gets me a first visa and he can get me a green card basically.
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by Stinky » Fri Dec 28, 2018 4:52 pm

Just get the CPL and have the regional airline pay for the ATP. The majority of them are doing that as part of the initial training now I think.
If your dad is a citizen you should check to see if you are a citizen. Was he a U.S citizen when you were born? If so, how long did he live in the US as a child? If you're not a citizen, have him file the paperwork immediately. It's a very long wait. It took me 12 years to get a green card.
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by C-GGGQ » Fri Dec 28, 2018 5:21 pm

Unfortunately no I do not count. I could not even be sponsored in as when he decided to move I was 22 and no longer a "dependant child" my younger brothers were. Need the visa through wife basically at this point.
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by seafeye » Tue Feb 19, 2019 7:28 pm

Just go fly at Piedmont airlines. And in 4-6 years you’ll be at American Airlines. No degree required. The sooner you get in the better.
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by schnitzel2k3 » Thu Feb 21, 2019 9:12 pm

seafeye wrote:
Tue Feb 19, 2019 7:28 pm
Just go fly at Piedmont airlines. And in 4-6 years you’ll be at American Airlines. No degree required. The sooner you get in the better.
Piedmont sponsoring green cards?

S.
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by confusedalot » Sun Mar 24, 2019 3:35 am

Stinky wrote:
Thu Nov 22, 2018 3:48 pm
It's harder now than it used to be. For me it was medical, verification letter and 50 question exam.
Now you're to take a CTP course which includes ground training and SIM and costs about $5000.
I got my faa the easy way over a decade ago. Easy.

What is a CTP course? Just curious.
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Re: Switching to flying in the US

Post by confusedalot » Sun Mar 24, 2019 3:51 am

confusedalot wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 3:35 am
Stinky wrote:
Thu Nov 22, 2018 3:48 pm
It's harder now than it used to be. For me it was medical, verification letter and 50 question exam.
Now you're to take a CTP course which includes ground training and SIM and costs about $5000.


I got my faa the easy way over a decade ago. Easy.

What is a CTP course? Just curious.
Never mind, just googled it.
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