Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

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timel
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Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by timel » Mon Jun 15, 2015 12:39 pm

:smt040 don't worry, insurances will get you covered.


http://blog.belairdirect.com/drones-pop ... =051793068
Popular and inexpensive, drones pose a number of risks for users. What’s their future in the insurance industry?

Deloitte’s 2015 Trends report predicts that personal use of drones will grow to over a million worldwide, including a projected 300,000 units sold over the course of this year. The drone is in fact becoming a coveted gift by virtue of its reasonable cost and the vast airspace Canada affords.

Corporations are also looking at the potential of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Logistics giant Amazon recently confirmed that it was testing delivery by drone in Canada.

A complex situation
Even if drone sales are rising and even if they’re the latest trendy birthday gift, drone use poses a number of problems in Canada at a number of different levels. This is evident by the recent $1,000 fine a Terrebonne resident had to pay for flying his drone in a residential area.

In fact, Transport Canada has stipulated that drones are aircrafts and are subject to the same rules. They must therefore follow Canadian Aviation Regulations and respect the Criminal Code as well as municipal, provincial and territorial regulations relating to the invasion and the right to privacy. For example, this means not flying a drone closer than150 metres from a person, animal, building, structure or vehicle and getting a permit to fly in certain zones and not flying closer than nine kilometres to an airport.

An activity that carries risk and the need for insurance
The insurance industry and Transport Canada consider drones to be aircraft. They are subject to limitations already in place.

While some insurers cover miniature airplanes and helicopters, these do not have the same status as drones. For most insurers, including belairdirect, drones are not insurable at the moment as losses due to the operation of an aircraft are excluded under our personal policies (for commercial purposes some types of protection are available on the market).

There is currently no insurance available to cover breakage or injury caused by a drone. Consequently, a person who loses control of a drone is entirely responsible for damages caused by the drone and is liable for such in the event of a lawsuit. The regulations in place should therefore be respected and users should be very conscious of the risks when they are using one of these machines.

A trend that is here to stay
Given the current situation, the industry is looking at various solutions. In time, a means for insuring drones and the damage they may cause will no doubt be found because they will likely soon be considered a normal family possession. This is indeed an issue to follow closely!
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Rudderless
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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by Rudderless » Mon Jun 15, 2015 8:23 pm

Just bought a drone, called our insurance company who are scrambling around trying to figure it out. They haven't called us back yet with a quote. They thought it might be covered under our house insurance, but I have my doubts. Meanwhile, I really question the need for insurance for a drone that weighs 2 pounds. Some kites weigh more than that. The props on the drone are plastic, they won't hurt anything except themselves (found that out right away lol).
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Meatservo
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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by Meatservo » Mon Jun 15, 2015 9:46 pm

What is the definition of a "drone"? In what way is a drone not the same thing as an R/C model plane or helicopter?

I actually know what the difference is: Model planes and helicopters are insured against unintentional damage of property if the owner/pilots are members of the M.A.A.C. (model aeronautics association of Canada) and they are built and flown in accordance with the regulations set out by this organization.

So a model helicopter that comes pre-built in a box, requires no practice or training to operate and is flown in populated urban areas with the intention of doing work or causing a nuisance, or is operated by someone who doesn't "feel" like joining the M.A.A.C and feels their rules are overly restrictive, are not insured.

Big surprise there. :roll:
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efestian
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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by efestian » Wed Jun 17, 2015 5:45 pm

Rudderless wrote:Just bought a drone, called our insurance company who are scrambling around trying to figure it out. They haven't called us back yet with a quote. They thought it might be covered under our house insurance, but I have my doubts. Meanwhile, I really question the need for insurance for a drone that weighs 2 pounds. Some kites weigh more than that. The props on the drone are plastic, they won't hurt anything except themselves (found that out right away lol).
A bird weighs less than 2 lbs too and if I hit it at 130MPH in the right place, it could mean a world of hurt. While you might respect the boundaries of an airport, I suspect the vast majority of "enthusiasts" will not respect the law or the damage these things are capable of.
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timel
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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by timel » Fri Jun 19, 2015 10:52 am

I was actually surprised to learn you need insurance for RC models, I am looking to get one.
If you brake someones window ..you are going to get sued for psychological damage? It is becoming a bit too much in my opinion...


I understand drones that have much more performance/capabilities are more of a threat, you don't want those swallowed by a jet engine or throught your windshield, yes those need regulations and insurances... But rc models.. Dang it.
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Meatservo
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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by Meatservo » Fri Jun 19, 2015 4:11 pm

Well, I don't think you *need* insurance for R/C models. I don't think there's a law or anything. But there is an organization you can join voluntarily, and one of the advantages of membership is the insurance that comes with it. You then have to fly your model in accordance with their rules though if you want to be covered.

I don't think there's anything illegal about flying a little model at a park or something, as long as you observe common-sense and don't become a menace.

I have some models and I am not a member, because I don't live in a place where it would make sense.
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185_guy
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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by 185_guy » Fri Jun 19, 2015 4:42 pm

The CARS defines a UAV, and a Model Aircraft. The word 'drone' is not included in any of these definitions.
Basically a model aircraft is any r/c flying machine used for recerational purposes. A UAV is basically any r/c flying machine used for non recreational purposes. If you want to fly a UAV, you need to have an SFOC, or fall under a list of exemptions to the CARS. In a nutshell, the list is size specific to the UAV, and has such things like flying it 5 miles from any aerodrome, below 300'AGL, 5 miles from a built up area, have insurance, have some basic aeronautical knowledge, flight within line of sight only............

To fly a model aircraft, you must comply with CARS 602.45, which basically says......do not endanger aviation safety and don't fly into clouds. There is no requirement for insurance. Also, a model aircraft can only weigh up to 35kg, above that, an SFOC is required.
Most cities have by-laws against flying r/c machines in parks, so be careful.
MAAC (Model Aeronautics Association of Canada) is like COPA for r/c pilots. Like already mentioned, if you follow the safety code, you are covered with a liability insurance. It is a good organization to join if you are serious about flying anything r/c, they do have a voice with TC and are trying to keep the rules open for hobbyists, separate from UAV rules.
If you are flying a small heli or small quadcopter the need for insurance is probably not there. However, if you want to fly your Phantom with a go-pro around your neighbourhood, you should reconsider your idea. If you want to sell the pics you take with your copter, you are now operating a UAV, and a bunch of rules now apply to you. TC has levied fines to a few who have been caught. Not much different than chisel charter operators, as the ones following the rules have a lot of time and money invested into equipment and training to ensure safe operations.
Flying r/c models is a great hobby, the cost and simplicity of getting something into the air is getting cheaper and easier all the time.
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Rudder Bug
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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by Rudder Bug » Sat Jun 20, 2015 9:18 pm

Great Post 185 Guy, you pretty much covered it all!

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J31
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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by J31 » Sat Jun 20, 2015 10:40 pm

Rudderless wrote:The props on the drone are plastic, they won't hurt anything except themselves (found that out right away lol).
Don't kid yourself.....a 2 pound Drone can do some serious hurt! Those thin "little" props are as sharp as a utility knife at 20,000 RPM plus.

http://robotics.stackexchange.com/quest ... -dangerous


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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by Benwa » Sun Jun 21, 2015 4:13 pm

Also if you carry a camera as a payload, and not only for FPV purposes, it falls in the UAV category.
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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by 185_guy » Mon Jun 22, 2015 9:46 am

^ Benwa, can you provide reference to a regulation stating your info?

There are some proposed regulations open for comment right now, that is one of the suggestions. However right now, I can put a camera on my rc plane and take pics or video, as long as I do not profit from it it is still considered a model aircraft, as it is being used for recerational purpose. Non recerational purpose is what defines a UAV, to my knowledge.
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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by aycarumba » Mon Jun 22, 2015 9:57 am

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Re: Drones: popular…and currently uninsured

Post by dirtdr » Mon Jun 22, 2015 10:04 am

I have been involved in R/C aircraft and MAAC for over 20 years.

MAAC insurance for recreational R/C fliers will only cover a person that is flying at a MAAC sanctioned R/C flying field. Some rules are in place regarding distance from towns and airports.

For those flying R/C in the field behind your house, or at the local airport that is not MAAC sactioned, MAAC insurance would not be valid.
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