Handling of power on take off and landing.

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Cat Driver
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Re: Handling of power on take off and landing.

Post by Cat Driver » Wed Aug 01, 2018 8:09 am

Bashing through the snow in an otter, 2 hands. An F1 driver doesn't use one hand, you get faster and more precise inputs with 2, /quote]

I don't recall having to be that aggressive with an airplane because of the snow conditions, was it hard on the airplane?

, but you knew that already.
Not from my own experience doing it.
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jg24
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Re: Handling of power on take off and landing.

Post by jg24 » Wed Aug 01, 2018 8:22 am

Some company SOPs, mainly overseas like the Caribbean some African operators are those that come to mind, have both hands on yoke after power was advanced to XX % NG or whatever initial setting they used. The captain would then set the power and guard the powers. If the captain was PF, he would guard the throttles with one hand though, as the ultimate decision maker... guess it all depends on SOPs.

As for myself, always kept one hand on throttles and one on yoke. Although, when I first started training on floats: touchdown, throttles back and I'd start pulling the yoke all the way back, and by then I'd add the second hand to keep the yoke back all the way. Also did that when training and landing on grass strips. That I do remember. Was just easier for me.
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Heliian
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Re: Handling of power on take off and landing.

Post by Heliian » Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:42 am

Cat Driver wrote:
Wed Aug 01, 2018 8:09 am
I don't recall having to be that aggressive with an airplane because of the snow conditions, was it hard on the airplane?
No, the point was to not be hard on the plane. It's probably more common in the Bush.
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Re: Handling of power on take off and landing.

Post by Cat Driver » Wed Aug 01, 2018 10:26 am

No, the point was to not be hard on the plane. It's probably more common in the Bush.
O.K. I see what you meant now,it is just the way you feel more in control by using two hands to control the airplane.

I also have done a lot of bush flying earlier in my career and was more comfortable using only one hand on the flight controls and the other on the throttle's .

What ever works best for a given pilot is the best way to fly them. :)
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After over a half a century of flying no one ever died because of my decision not to fly.

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