Why Do I Want this.........?????

This forum has been developed to discuss aviation related topics.

Moderators: lilfssister, North Shore, ahramin, sky's the limit, sepia, Sulako, I WAS Birddog

User avatar
mbflyer
Rank 1
Rank 1
Posts: 43
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2004 7:58 pm
Location: Next to my computer

Why Do I Want this.........?????

Post by mbflyer »

So I am sitting here wondering to myself yet again..why do I have this desire to fly for a living, and why won't it go away? Am I too old to start? are there no opportunities in the area I want to fly? Is it just a pipe dream?

I'm 36... Is that too old to start? Well......re-start actually. I have 25 hrs training time, but haven't flown in a couple of years due to other commitments, and lack of funds. Am I better off saving up for all my training before I start, or am I better off to pay as I go?

Am I giving up a solid professional career, for a life of uncertainty? I'm a professional accountant earning over $60K a year, and potential to be over six figures in five years time, yet I would walk away from this in an instant for a flying career.

I could continue in my current career and fly for fun, but that would probably make me want to fly for a living all the more.

There is a very appropriate quote I saw on a website for a flight training school " Nobody dreams of becoming an accountant when they grow up.

And what about the family?? I have a house with mortgage payments, two young kids and a wife who works part time. Is is irresponsible of me to want to fly with these commitments?

Am I too old to pursue this as a career? Is there any hope if I do? I'm not looking to fly 747s or 340s. My ideal avaiation career would be flying bush, float planes off the west coast, or island hopping somewhere in the Carribean.........

Geez...........I think I need a drink ( and advice!!)
---------- ADS -----------
  

No Conflict
Rank 7
Rank 7
Posts: 610
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2004 6:48 am
Location: All over the friggin' place....

Post by No Conflict »

Hey,

Got my first flying job at 32... I admit, I slacked off for quite a while and then realized that flying was where I want to be... I like the ever changing view out my office window, along with the days off :)

Do you give up your "day" job?? Well, You will be getting SHIT wages starting off, and most probably be moving to a remote area....I know guys/gals who LOVE this, and others who HATE this....depends on how you feel..

Will you get the same satisfaction?? Hmm, I was a senior buyer at a good company..... I decided it was not for me.... Was it easy? F#ck NO!... was it worth it? F@ck YA! I get to fly to all kinds of places, fly with awesome people and experience things that most people only dream about.... but that's me...
Don't know if this helps...


NC
---------- ADS -----------
  

mcrit
Rank (9)
Rank (9)
Posts: 1973
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2004 9:01 pm

Post by mcrit »

There is a very appropriate quote I saw on a website for a flight training school " Nobody dreams of becoming an accountant when they grow up.
I really hate to sound negative, but that company went down the tubes and took alot of people with it. If you've got a mortage and people depending on you, think very carefully before you give up a good job for aviation. Right now the industry is really good, just like it was before 911, but I would lay money on it taking true nose dive within 2 years. All those guys that are flying for AC and Jazz right now won't be in the near future.
---------- ADS -----------
  

200hr Wonder
Rank 10
Rank 10
Posts: 2180
Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2005 1:52 pm
Location: CYVR
Contact:

Post by 200hr Wonder »

Real simple: Because what if sucks.
---------- ADS -----------
  

Zatopec
Rank Moderator
Rank Moderator
Posts: 332
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2004 7:02 pm
Location: Meters from the end of the road... for real.

Post by Zatopec »

I hear you!

I gave up full time flying a couple years ago. Now I find myself making in the high five figures and possibly six by next year, but even then I sometimes wonder what I'm doing here feeling that I'd rather be flying.

Only difference is that I have the hours and I'm current. Since the market is good, I decided to check things out. I'll see what the offers will be and go from there. I won't leave for anything but if the right conditions are there, I will seriously consider returning to flight.

Guess we have to do what really makes us happy after all.
---------- ADS -----------
  
Zatopec
_______

He who has his ear to the ground has his ass exposed

Smitty
Rank 4
Rank 4
Posts: 215
Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2004 6:20 am

Post by Smitty »

One fella I taught had a similar story.

He had left instructing in the early 90's to become a high school teacher. He was actually the instructor of my instructor. But he always felt a little piece was missing in his life.

After a few years of teaching, he did some soul searching and he and his wife (after all it wasn't his decision alone with a wife and a few young kids) had decided he should follow his flying passion. He was in his mid 30's

He renewed his instrument rating and found a corporate job followed quickly by a tier 3 job. He is a good guy, a good pilot and one of the happiest guys I've met.

I also have a friend who left a secure and financially rewarding job in trading currencies to follow his dream of flying. He was also in his early thirties and he is much happier now than ever. He now flies for one of the two big carriers in this country (you have a 50/50 chance of guessing which one).

Follow your passion. If the risk is too much, then you will never be happy in this job. But if you have a die hard love of flying, then you will never be happy doing anything else. You are never too old to do something you enjoy. The choice, ultimately, is up to you.

Just my humble opinion.
---------- ADS -----------
  
Last edited by Smitty on Mon Dec 25, 2006 11:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Red Line
Rank 4
Rank 4
Posts: 203
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2004 11:08 am
Location: Here, for now.

Post by Red Line »

Always hang on to your dreams; they're what make life worth living!

I know of a guy that was a firefighter, but started flight training in his late thirties I believe. He was good friends with the owners of a charter company and started flying part-time as a co-joe on a ho. He was a real stand-up kinda guy and soon became captain. This ho didn't fly much, so it was rarely a conflict with work. A few years later, he got his pension from firefighting and became a full-time part-time charter pilot. So it can happen.

Why did I choose to become a pilot? Simply because I knew I'd feel disatisfied or lacking some sense of well-being at any other job. I truely felt I'd always regret not at least trying to be a pilot.

Talk it over with your better half and see if there's a way to make it work financially.

My two pennies.

Red
---------- ADS -----------
  

...
Rank 11
Rank 11
Posts: 4581
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2004 7:18 pm

Post by ... »

...As long as we continue to treat this profession in an unprofessional manner...we will never receive the level of pay associated with the large responsibilty of transporting people by air.

Once the hiring slows down OR stops...people will again be offering to pay for their PPC's...brutal but its a fact and there is nothing one can do except make it illegal to do.

However I still have faith in people as I still believe in the mentor program. However...I will only be mentoring people that want to get out of the industry and making some real money and have the Xmas holidays off!!!! :wink: :lol:
---------- ADS -----------
  

snaproll20
Rank 7
Rank 7
Posts: 636
Joined: Tue Jun 01, 2004 7:50 pm

Post by snaproll20 »

It is a tough decision whether to follow your dreams, or stay secure and keep your family.

Even an exceptional woman finds it difficult to follow the meanderings of a professional pilot.

If you can never be happy not flying, then you have to do it, but remember your family will share your fall-out.

Retired after many years in the business, I feel blessed that I was able to do much of what I did. Was I successful? I do not really know.

It is hugely disappointing that my decisions have not left me with a secure financial package. Would I do it again? I don't know. I suppose I would make some different decisions. One of them would be to have treated my family better.

There is no great financial security in aviation, often not even to the pilots who make it into the left seat of big jets because many are paying alimony to more than one woman.

Perhaps you could try being an aviation accountant (THAT takes a special talent!!!) Perhaps you could be an instructor on the weekends and try getting your feet wet without jumping in the deep end.

You already seem to think the grass is greener...........a severe flaw for many pilots.

I fear, understand and salute your predicament.

Good Luck, and do tell how it works out.
---------- ADS -----------
  

alpha1
Rank 3
Rank 3
Posts: 177
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2005 8:57 am

Post by alpha1 »

if u really want to re-purpose your career by moving into aviation, try this simple test: while you're still working as an accountant, cut your wage by 75% for the next six months, and then imagine living on that salary for the next 5 years at least...

don't want to discourage you, but with a wife and kids its no longer about exclusively following "your" dream, but from your post it sounds like you already know that.

best of luck.
---------- ADS -----------
  
"Honi soit qui mal y pense"

Pete
Rank 7
Rank 7
Posts: 534
Joined: Tue Feb 22, 2005 11:39 pm

Post by Pete »

why not stay as an accountant, atleast its stable...earn your CPL Instructor rating and fly part-time/weekends when your not at your full time job? That way your still flying, and some pocket change at that. Plus if its a toss up between stable income and hating your job...atleast teaching on the weekends gives you something to look forward too no?

I think there should be more guys like this out there. Ive come across, and flown with 3 who had nice paying jobs and instructed on the weekends...these were the best instructors Ive had, nicest too. They wanted to teach and didnt just sit there looking at the hobbs.

Canada needs more p-time instructors I believe.
---------- ADS -----------
  

North Shore
Rank Moderator
Rank Moderator
Posts: 5392
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2004 3:47 pm
Location: Straight outta Dundarave...

Post by North Shore »

Dude,

Stick with the accounting - it's way more reliable. When did you ever hear of an accounting company going TU? It'll pay your mortgage, send your kids to private school, university, and pay off the summer cottage. There's no worrying about a sim check or ride every 6 months, no worrying about a medical every year, no stress about the weather, how much can you carry, should I take the turbine f/o job in Thompson or the captain piston job in Lynn Lake? You'll get to spend summers with your kids, birthdays, anniversaries, Christmases etc at home. Save a little cash, finish off your private, and buy a Cub, or Cruiser, put it on floats and store it at your local lake. Then you can fly off to go fishing or hunting whenever you want - on your schedule, no waiting for a group of fat turkeys to get organised, or your boss to finally decide that he wants the drum of gas at ex lake, and the 100lbr of propane at wye lake... If you are really desperate for your flying fix, build up to your instructor rating, and teach others, but keep your day job.
I really enjoyed my first few years of training, and work, but now it's a job, plain and simple. Yeah, it has its cool moments, and "I can't believe that they are paying me to do this!" times, but the rest of the time.... :roll:
You mention float and west coast flying - don't forget that most of it is summer work only - the wx is good and the days are long, so you end up working your ass off, 14 hour days 6 days a week, flying right up to (and beyond, sometimes) your CARS limits, and then getting laid off, or spending your winter living in someplace that gets old really quickly without a plane to fly.

PM for more if you wish...
---------- ADS -----------
  
Say, what's that mountain goat doing up here in the mist?
Happiness is V1 at Thompson!
Ass, Licence, Job. In that order.

sky's the limit
Rank Moderator
Rank Moderator
Posts: 4614
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2005 11:38 am
Location: Now where's the starter button on this thing???

Post by sky's the limit »

I too respect your predicament, but before making ANY decision on entirely leaving accounting - PLEASE remove all romantic notions of the aviation industry/life. It will colour your decision, and not in a good way.

The others here have said there is good and bad things about flying for a living, monetary uncertainty, and a healthy dose of unprofessional behavior... they are right. If you can be making $100k/yr+, and are as addicted to flying as you say, maybe purchasing your own a/c and flying for fun is the way to go. There are a number of folks on here who do that, and in this day and age of fractional ownership, it's not hard. You can take your training as far as you want, but maintain some form of financial security as you get older.

This industry eats it's young, and is NOT a professional occupation - if it needs you, things are good, if it doesn't, YOU are SOL.

Good luck,

STL
---------- ADS -----------
  

User avatar
Cat Driver
Top Poster
Top Poster
Posts: 18921
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2004 8:31 pm

Post by Cat Driver »

I was fortunate to have flown for a living before big brother started to regulate the industry to death.

I did not quit because of age or the inability to fly, I quit because I do not want to be a zombie controlled by morons making up new rules.

You see I do know how to think and fly and prefer not to be controlled by those who fly desks pounding out more and more stupid restrictions about something they obviously have no understanding of.

Cat
---------- ADS -----------
  
The hardest thing about flying is knowing when to say no


After over a half a century of flying no one ever died because of my decision not to fly.

Red Line
Rank 4
Rank 4
Posts: 203
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2004 11:08 am
Location: Here, for now.

Post by Red Line »

:axe:
---------- ADS -----------
  

User avatar
Cat Driver
Top Poster
Top Poster
Posts: 18921
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2004 8:31 pm

Post by Cat Driver »

Ahhh, what he hell I am bored so I may as well respond.

Red Line my posts seem to irritate you so I would assume I won't see you coming out here for some lessons on the finer points of how to really fly an airplane? :mrgreen:
---------- ADS -----------
  
The hardest thing about flying is knowing when to say no


After over a half a century of flying no one ever died because of my decision not to fly.

User avatar
mbflyer
Rank 1
Rank 1
Posts: 43
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2004 7:58 pm
Location: Next to my computer

Post by mbflyer »

Well, that's quite the disparity of advice.
alpha1 wrote:if u really want to re-purpose your career by moving into aviation, try this simple test: while you're still working as an accountant, cut your wage by 75% for the next six months, and then imagine living on that salary for the next 5 years at least...
Interesting idea. Although we (wife and I) are doing something similar right now - living off my salary and banking hers. Although if I pursue this, my thinking is to cut my costs back as much as possible for the next few months so that I can get into training with a big push late in the spring, this way I'll have the $$ in advance. ( can't do it earlier due to other commitments)

One of the advantages with my current career is that if I decide to make a switch in careers , my current career allows a fallback. There is also a huge demand for accountants so it would be relatively easy to get back into it.

Is the grass greener? From a financial standpoint no.

14hr days, 6 days a week, well......that's really nothing new. ( I think I had calculated that in Nov. I put in 70 hrs ot? and 30 was in one week.)

Romantic notions - well I also spent 6 years in the Infantry, so I guess it couldn't be more uncomfortable then living in a hole in the ground.

p/t instructors - I agree, it seems that unless you have ownership in a flying school, the whole idea of instructing is just a stepping stone.

something to look at I guess. (and think about)
---------- ADS -----------
  

altiplano
Rank 11
Rank 11
Posts: 3906
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2005 2:24 pm

Post by altiplano »

mbflyer wrote:14hr days, 6 days a week, well......that's really nothing new. ( I think I had calculated that in Nov. I put in 70 hrs ot? and 30 was in one week.)
It's good that OT is nothing new to you as 14 hour days are par for the course in aviation... The big difference will be not getting paid any extra for the 40+ hours of "OT" you put in this week.
---------- ADS -----------
  

Red Line
Rank 4
Rank 4
Posts: 203
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2004 11:08 am
Location: Here, for now.

Post by Red Line »

Cat Driver wrote:Red Line my posts seem to irritate you so I would assume I won't see you coming out here for some lessons on the finer points of how to really fly an airplane? :mrgreen:
Ahhh ., I'm sorry if I come accross as a hard-ass :lol: You seem to have a good head on your shoulders and you used to bring a lot of really great advice to this forum. I'm a long-time reader, though low-time poster. My name's Chris if you want the whole first name basis thing. I don't like TC any more than the next pilot, and hey I'm always looking for ways to upgrade my training. :D
---------- ADS -----------
  

Phileas Fogg
Rank 3
Rank 3
Posts: 161
Joined: Sun Dec 24, 2006 5:37 pm

Post by Phileas Fogg »

Cat Driver wrote:Ahhh, what he hell I am bored so I may as well respond.

Red Line my posts seem to irritate you so I would assume I won't see you coming out here for some lessons on the finer points of how to really fly an airplane? :mrgreen:
haha! classic! :D
---------- ADS -----------
  

User avatar
raven54
Rank 7
Rank 7
Posts: 548
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2004 9:14 am
Location: a dumpster

Post by raven54 »

We get it man, you love TC. The horse is dead...
---------- ADS -----------
  

User avatar
mbflyer
Rank 1
Rank 1
Posts: 43
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2004 7:58 pm
Location: Next to my computer

Post by mbflyer »

altiplano wrote: It's good that OT is nothing new to you as 14 hour days are par for the course in aviation... The big difference will be not getting paid any extra for the 40+ hours of "OT" you put in this week.
well......since I am considered executive management, I don't get paid for OT, never have since I have been on salary. Although, come to think of it, I am supposed to get a week of at xmas in lieu of OT for the year, but since that "perk" was given to everyone, my week in lieu morphed into one day in lieu.
---------- ADS -----------
  

North Shore
Rank Moderator
Rank Moderator
Posts: 5392
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2004 3:47 pm
Location: Straight outta Dundarave...

Post by North Shore »

"Still a man hears what he wants to hear, and disregards the rest..."
---------- ADS -----------
  
Say, what's that mountain goat doing up here in the mist?
Happiness is V1 at Thompson!
Ass, Licence, Job. In that order.

alpha1
Rank 3
Rank 3
Posts: 177
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2005 8:57 am

Post by alpha1 »

northshore,

exactly.
---------- ADS -----------
  
"Honi soit qui mal y pense"

. ._
Top Poster
Top Poster
Posts: 7374
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2004 5:50 pm
Location: Cowering in my little room because the Water Cooler is locked.
Contact:

Post by . ._ »

mbflyer,

I say get your PPL first, then decide what you want to do. You will never regret completing your PPL. Pay as you go.

Keep us informed, as there are lurkers on here in the same boat as you.

Good luck!

-istp :D
---------- ADS -----------
  

Post Reply

Return to “General Comments”