Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

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Sokol1
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Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

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Big Pistons Forever
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Re: Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

Post by Big Pistons Forever »

I would suggest this exercise should be done in a full flight simulator.
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Sokol1
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Re: Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

Post by Sokol1 »

Hi, Examiners here in europe often check this manoeuvre (inflight) during skill tests and pilot proficiency exams. Above 1000 ft agl it's comfortable. Biggest threat is normally local traffic. In this video it was early morning on a weekday. Airfield was empty.
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Last edited by Sokol1 on Sat Jan 09, 2021 12:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
ahramin
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Re: Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

Post by ahramin »

Why do you pitch to an FPV angle after liftoff?
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Sokol1
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Re: Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

Post by Sokol1 »

ahramin wrote: Sat Jan 09, 2021 12:09 pm Why do you pitch to an FPV angle after liftoff?
On the PC12 we are able to change the flight guidance attitude bars displayed on the PFD screen (single cue PC12 legacy, cross pointer Boeing, or FPV). Highest level of tech is to fly using the flight path vector which replaces the traditional airplane symbols. During take off the FD was selected OFF and therefore the GA command was not displayed. Pitching to 7-8 degrees flight path vector established a normal climb profile. Left of the FPV is also a fast slow pointer which indicates if the airplane is accelerating tor decelerating.
With new technology it's really important to.. "out with the old in with the new" and just adapt to use the new technology. The FPV is more jumpy than the traditional airplane symbol but once you start using it your scan really widens to include other features in the synthetic visions. When you get used to it the work load really reduces and the plane can be flown more accurately.
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ahramin
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Re: Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

Post by ahramin »

So if I understand correctly you are pitching to get a specific FPV because you have an FPV? Is this a Pilatus procedure?
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Sokol1
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Re: Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

Post by Sokol1 »

ahramin wrote: Sat Jan 09, 2021 4:08 pm So if I understand correctly you are pitching to get a specific FPV because you have an FPV? Is this a Pilatus procedure?
The flight path vector on the PFD is used as the main reference for flight guidance. Technically the traditional attitude is still there in white.

Take a look at this video for more context. There is a short clip showing the flight path vector in green at 5:43s. The green arrow next to the flight path vector is the fast slow indicator.


Image

The image above the airplane is neither accl or decelerating, is banked and maintaining altitude. All the info is derived from the green FPV, the green fast slow indicator and the extended white horizon line. The white line horizon uses predictive technology and changes depending on the aircraft speed (you don't notice this change.) You can see the normal pitch indicators (airplane symbol) are at 5 degrees nose up. The difference between the pitch indicators and the FPV is the angle of attack. We teach this.

Normally during takeoff we fly with the magenta FD commanding the FPV a GA attitude. In the case of the engine fail demonstration we just pitch the flight path vector to establish a normal climb profile while respecting angle of attack and speed during reconfiguration.

What I like about the FPV is if you end up in a situation with marginal VFR weather and having to fly at slower speeds, it's really reduces workload and focus the scan solely on the PFD.

Personally, I didn't train at Pilatus, but I'm in contact with people who have.
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ahramin
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Re: Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

Post by ahramin »

Sorry I'm obviously not making myself clear. I have +10k hours flying aircraft with FPV, I'm not asking what it is or how it works. During takeoff in the video you state that you are pitching to 7-8° FPV, what I'm asking is:

1. Is this a Pilatus procedure or is this your own procedure?

2. Since the aircraft is capable of very different vertical flight paths under different takeoff conditions (WAT), what is the reason for targeting a specific flight path angle?
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Sokol1
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Re: Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

Post by Sokol1 »

see below
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Last edited by Sokol1 on Sun Jan 10, 2021 2:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Sokol1
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Re: Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

Post by Sokol1 »

ahramin wrote: Sun Jan 10, 2021 12:10 pm Sorry I'm obviously not making myself clear. I have +10k hours flying aircraft with FPV, I'm not asking what it is or how it works. During takeoff in the video you state that you are pitching to 7-8° FPV, what I'm asking is:

1. Is this a Pilatus procedure or is this your own procedure?

2. Since the aircraft is capable of very different vertical flight paths under different takeoff conditions (WAT), what is the reason for targeting a specific flight path angle?
Hi Abramin,

Thank you for brining this up. With more thought and consideration I really should next time not say FPV because

A. fpv is not a pitch attitude so it doesnt make sense
B. Pitch bars are used for rotation timing and to establish the pitch attitude.
C. if students are too focused on the FPV without referencing the speed trend indicator (acc/deccl) or speed it could get them in the bad situation.
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Edelweiss air
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Re: Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

Post by Edelweiss air »

Big Pistons Forever wrote: Sat Jan 09, 2021 11:04 am I would suggest this exercise should be done in a full flight simulator.
Thought the same thing. The other videos on the channel suggest this is an initial checkout, potentially for some owner / operators? I get the impression from some of the other videos this is a bit more machine than they have experience for....
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Sokol1
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Re: Engine Failure After takeoff (simulated)

Post by Sokol1 »

In Europe in order to fly the PC12, pilots need to first successfully pass a class rating course. Minimum experience requirements to enter the course according to regulation is 200 Total time plus a high performance aircraft training course. The class rating can be completed in as low as 10 hours, but depending on students abilities and experience it can be extended 20, 30 hours or indefinitely. If an inexperienced pilot manages to past the course it's then left up to the state regulators, operator and insurance to set the standard. I.e. whether they will fly co pilot or under go further line training. It really depends.
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