AME / Avionics Apprentice Question

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jay2x
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AME / Avionics Apprentice Question

#1 Post by jay2x » Sun May 28, 2017 8:04 pm

I recently graduate the Avionics program at the BCIT campus. I got hired as an AME apprentice, it looks like they will teach me the basics in AME with a combo of Avionics. I'm not sure in anyone else is on the same boat as me, but I guess I'm trying to be proactive to get my career started.

How would this look like in my log book?

Would it be okay with TC?

Is there such thing as all around AME?

On the side note, any suggestion on the tools I would need?

I think my school did not really cover the tool control portion which was emphasized by my employer. How do you guys what comes in and out of your tools?

I would really appreciate your thoughts and suggestions. It'll help me a lot. :prayer: :prayer: :prayer:
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plhought
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Re: AME / Avionics Apprentice Question

#2 Post by plhought » Mon May 29, 2017 2:48 pm

As you only completed the 'E' technical examinations at the conclusion of your course at BCIT, you are currently only "eligible" for the 'E' license when you complete your appreticeship/tasks and pass the CARS examination.

But do not fret! and 'E' guy is just as much an AME as a 'M' guy.

Focus on the 'E' ATA's for your logbook for now - They'll want to see anything and everything electrical filled out (Check here: https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/ ... g-2553.htm). Take note of some of the things in ATA 30 and 32 - don't forget those.

Don't fret if you work for an operator that doesn't have turbine/piston/helicopter. The key is 70% of applicable tasks. Keep sections blank if your employer does not operate/fix these types.

It's good practice as well to see the servicing section and even a ground run signed out in there - it shows to the inspector you're more than just a box-changer/wire-fixer!

In your case, it sounds like you will be doing it all, so take all the experience you can. Keep two seperate logbooks though - one with your 'E' tasks that you can submit and get licensed with down the road - and another 'M(1)or(2)' book to put some M tasks in there for later.

Later in your career you can write the 'M' technical examinations and get either your M1 or M2 along with your 'E' - It will make you very desirable to employers!

There are plenty of 'all-round' AME's - Usually dual licensed M1/M2 guys that work frequently in chasing electrons or a couple M2/E licensed individuals having done the applicable technical exams down the road. Larger operations tend to 'segregate' E and M guys - but as aircraft become increasingly sophisticated - the line is constantly being blurred.

I myself did lots of what many would characterize as 'E' work with my previous employer - with the exception of major avionics/autopilot installs. Use the correct tools, references, and you'll never have a problem.

Any more q's feel free to PM or reply,

Best of luck with new job!
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Re: AME / Avionics Apprentice Question

#3 Post by jay2x » Tue May 30, 2017 1:07 pm

plhought wrote:As you only completed the 'E' technical examinations at the conclusion of your course at BCIT, you are currently only "eligible" for the 'E' license when you complete your appreticeship/tasks and pass the CARS examination.

But do not fret! and 'E' guy is just as much an AME as a 'M' guy.

Focus on the 'E' ATA's for your logbook for now - They'll want to see anything and everything electrical filled out (Check here: https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/ ... g-2553.htm). Take note of some of the things in ATA 30 and 32 - don't forget those.

Don't fret if you work for an operator that doesn't have turbine/piston/helicopter. The key is 70% of applicable tasks. Keep sections blank if your employer does not operate/fix these types.

It's good practice as well to see the servicing section and even a ground run signed out in there - it shows to the inspector you're more than just a box-changer/wire-fixer!

In your case, it sounds like you will be doing it all, so take all the experience you can. Keep two seperate logbooks though - one with your 'E' tasks that you can submit and get licensed with down the road - and another 'M(1)or(2)' book to put some M tasks in there for later.

Later in your career you can write the 'M' technical examinations and get either your M1 or M2 along with your 'E' - It will make you very desirable to employers!

There are plenty of 'all-round' AME's - Usually dual licensed M1/M2 guys that work frequently in chasing electrons or a couple M2/E licensed individuals having done the applicable technical exams down the road. Larger operations tend to 'segregate' E and M guys - but as aircraft become increasingly sophisticated - the line is constantly being blurred.

I myself did lots of what many would characterize as 'E' work with my previous employer - with the exception of major avionics/autopilot installs. Use the correct tools, references, and you'll never have a problem.

Any more q's feel free to PM or reply,

Best of luck with new job!

Thank you for the time in your detailed reply. That's a great insight. I would like to know how you do tool control? It would be nice if you can take a picture and show off the tool sets =D cheers thanks in advance again.
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helicopterray
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Re: AME / Avionics Apprentice Question

#4 Post by helicopterray » Tue May 30, 2017 5:12 pm

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plhought
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Re: AME / Avionics Apprentice Question

#5 Post by plhought » Tue May 30, 2017 10:33 pm

Tool control can be anything. Tools scanned electronically when the leave/enter the tool box is the cutting edge (Look up Hazet Tool Control), to simply making sure you put your tools away at night/morning. For our practical purposes - recognizing that it's important not to lose tools usually suffices.

During those quiet times at work, you can cut some foam and shadow your box/pelican case.

I wouldn't fret too much about it if you are a reasonably organized person.
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