The difference between a BRS and non-BRS chute

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pelmet
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The difference between a BRS and non-BRS chute

Post by pelmet » Fri Aug 31, 2018 7:04 pm

With BRS(watch the pilots right hand in a real accident from a spin test that became unrecoverable)…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwZrtYgnP7s



Without BRS....

"C-IKGC, a privately operated Spectrum Beaver basic ultra-light aircraft, had just departed for a sight-seeing flight from Indus/Winters Aire Park, AB (CFY4) with one person on board. As the aircraft was in the climb passing approximately 800 feet above the ground, the engine stopped. The pilot checked the fuel valves and tried to restart the engine, however with no success. Seeing a canola field below the aircraft, the pilot elected to activate a spring-loaded parachute device to slow down the descent. Unable to release the parachute with the left hand, the pilot slipped the right shoulder out of the harness, released the grip on the control stick, and tried to pull the parachute release with both hands. During this action, the aircraft experienced an aerodynamic stall of the wings. The pilot was unable to recover from the stall before the impact with the ground. The aircraft was substantially damaged, and the pilot sustained serious injuries. A witness called 911 and both fire services and ambulance attended. There was no fire, and the emergency locater transmitter (ELT) did not activate."



I have flown three types with a BRS. In the Cirrus, the pin is always pulled from the handle before engine start. But in the LSA's, the handle is in the same area as the aircraft in the video and the instructors recommended when checking me out to leave the pin in place, just in case the handle was to accidentally be pulled. What do you do?
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Heliian
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Re: The difference between a BRS and non-BRS chute

Post by Heliian » Sat Sep 01, 2018 10:45 am

Follow the manufacturer's instructions? It should be no different than other emergency equipment. How many inadvertent parachute releases have there been?

BRS = Ballistic Recovery Systems (manufacturer of ballistic parachutes)
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Re: The difference between a BRS and non-BRS chute

Post by rigpiggy » Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:36 pm

Most of these chutes are BRS, they started in the experimental market prior to going certified
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pelmet
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Re: The difference between a BRS and non-BRS chute

Post by pelmet » Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:44 pm

One LSA POH says to remove the safety pin for flight. The other mentions the BRS as installed equipment but gives no direction. I personally leave the pin installed except on the Cirrus where accidental deployment is unlikely. Maybe it is unlikely on the LSA's as well with the handles on the lower panel but an instructor did say that a student mistakenly grabbed the BRS handle on him once.

I'm sure instructors on this forum have seen a student grab the wrong thing before. Maybe a passenger would also for some inexplicable reason(like a handle to hold onto in turbulence).
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pelmet
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Re: The difference between a BRS and non-BRS chute

Post by pelmet » Thu Nov 29, 2018 2:42 pm

Heliian wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 10:45 am
Follow the manufacturer's instructions? It should be no different than other emergency equipment. How many inadvertent parachute releases have there been?
pelmet wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:44 pm
I'm sure instructors on this forum have seen a student grab the wrong thing before. Maybe a passenger would also for some inexplicable reason(like a handle to hold onto in turbulence).
Flew one of the types again the other day. The safety pin has been removed by the flight school(which is owned by the aircraft manufacturer) and has been replaced with a secured tie wrap now holding it permanently in position. I guess they don't want it used.
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Meatservo
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Re: The difference between a BRS and non-BRS chute

Post by Meatservo » Fri Nov 30, 2018 3:29 am

pelmet wrote:
Fri Aug 31, 2018 7:04 pm

"C-IKGC, a privately operated Spectrum Beaver basic ultra-light aircraft, had just departed for a sight-seeing flight from Indus/Winters Aire Park, AB (CFY4) with one person on board. As the aircraft was in the climb passing approximately 800 feet above the ground, the engine stopped. The pilot checked the fuel valves and tried to restart the engine, however with no success. Seeing a canola field below the aircraft, the pilot elected to activate a spring-loaded parachute device to slow down the descent. Unable to release the parachute with the left hand, the pilot slipped the right shoulder out of the harness, released the grip on the control stick, and tried to pull the parachute release with both hands. During this action, the aircraft experienced an aerodynamic stall of the wings. The pilot was unable to recover from the stall before the impact with the ground. The aircraft was substantially damaged, and the pilot sustained serious injuries. A witness called 911 and both fire services and ambulance attended. There was no fire, and the emergency locater transmitter (ELT) did not activate.
Sounds like an episode of "Inspector Gadget" to me. How about just gliding to a landing in the canola field without all the pricking around with spring-loaded parachute contraptions? The issue here is inadequate flying training.
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Re: The difference between a BRS and non-BRS chute

Post by 5x5 » Sat Dec 01, 2018 10:58 am

Meatservo wrote:
Fri Nov 30, 2018 3:29 am
How about just gliding to a landing in the canola field without all the pricking around with spring-loaded parachute contraptions?
No way! Like Cirrus says "Pull early, pull often."
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pelmet
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Re: The difference between a BRS and non-BRS chute

Post by pelmet » Fri Dec 07, 2018 10:47 pm

pelmet wrote:
Thu Nov 29, 2018 2:42 pm
Heliian wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 10:45 am
Follow the manufacturer's instructions? It should be no different than other emergency equipment. How many inadvertent parachute releases have there been?
pelmet wrote:
Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:44 pm
I'm sure instructors on this forum have seen a student grab the wrong thing before. Maybe a passenger would also for some inexplicable reason(like a handle to hold onto in turbulence).
Flew one of the types again the other day. The safety pin has been removed by the flight school(which is owned by the aircraft manufacturer) and has been replaced with a secured tie wrap now holding it permanently in position. I guess they don't want it used.
Got updated info on the tie wrap. According to a maintenance person at the assembly site/flying school, the tie wrap is one of those thin ones and is supposed to break with a 28lb pull force. I didn't know those little tie wraps required only that amount of force to break. Felt like trying but decided not to.
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Re: The difference between a BRS and non-BRS chute

Post by JasonE » Sat Dec 08, 2018 8:10 am

pelmet wrote:
Fri Dec 07, 2018 10:47 pm
Got updated info on the tie wrap. According to a maintenance person at the assembly site/flying school, the tie wrap is one of those thin ones and is supposed to break with a 28lb pull force. I didn't know those little tie wraps required only that amount of force to break. Felt like trying but decided not to.
So it is being used as a witness wire. We have this on glider canopy releases. In the event of an emergency, grab the handles to release (wire breaks) and bail.
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pelmet
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Re: The difference between a BRS and non-BRS chute

Post by pelmet » Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:06 pm

JasonE wrote:
Sat Dec 08, 2018 8:10 am
pelmet wrote:
Fri Dec 07, 2018 10:47 pm
Got updated info on the tie wrap. According to a maintenance person at the assembly site/flying school, the tie wrap is one of those thin ones and is supposed to break with a 28lb pull force. I didn't know those little tie wraps required only that amount of force to break. Felt like trying but decided not to.
So it is being used as a witness wire. We have this on glider canopy releases. In the event of an emergency, grab the handles to release (wire breaks) and bail.
My guess is that it is there to prevent accidental deployments.
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